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Corporate Systems and Technology


Effects of Electrocution


Posted By on Mar 29, 2017

Effects of Electrocution

Electrocution, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is one of the “fatal four,” or one of the major causes of occupational accidents resulting to injuries and deaths in construction sites. In the whole of U.S., however, the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) says that it is the fifth leading cause of work-related injuries and deaths.

Workers who are most prone to electrocution accidents include electricians, electrical helpers, utility workers, construction workers and those working in manufacturing sites. The highest number of injuries and deaths, however, come from the those who work in construction sites and those whose work is directly involved in the maintenance and repair of overhead power lines. Power line workers often accidentally come in contact with overhead power lines, while in construction sites workers sometimes accidentally get electrocuted by high voltage wires or by arcing or jumping high levels of power from electrically charged cables (high voltage refers to voltage above 500).

According to San Diego personal injury attorneys of Ritter & Associates, the United States Bureau of Labor reports that roughly 150,000 construction site injuries and almost 1,000 fatalities occur every year in the U.S.; about 400 of these fatalities are due to electrocution. Workers, who suffer work-related injuries, though, may be able to receive financial support to help pay for medical bills and other damages.

As explained by the firm Abel Law, construction sites need electricity to power different types of tools and equipment. Though needed, this flow of energy can also be dangerous if not handled properly. The following types of faulty products can put a person at risk of electrocution:

• Faulty power strips
• Faulty power tools
• Faulty cords attached to power tools
• Faulty extension cords

The effects of electrocution are always serious because it makes the body a conduit instead of it fending off electricity. As the body becomes a conduit, it allows high voltage of electrical current to cause injuries both inside and outside it, such as severe internal and/or external burns, spinal cord injuries, brain damage, heart attack, muscle damage, paralysis and death. Muscle damage can result to swelling of the limb which, in turn, can lead to “compartment syndrome” (compression of the arteries) wherein blood is prevented from reaching the (affected) limb.

Other effects of severe electrical shocks include intense muscle contractions, fatal heart arrhythmia, brain and nerve injuries, serious injuries to internal organs and fall accidents.

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The Dram Shop Act: Making Irresponsible Hosts and Business Establishments Equally Accountable for Alcohol-related Accidents, Injuries and Deaths

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) records show that in 2013, more than 1.1 million alcohol-impaired drivers were arrested and charged with driving under the influence (DUI). During the previous year, a study revealed that the number of those who drove while under the influence of alcohol was 29.1 million. Drunk driving is a major in the U.S. and in all the other parts of the world. This is despite the continuous education and warnings to drivers about the dangers of drinking and driving. Thus, since the early part of the 1900s up to this time, many people drive while impaired and a lot of those who do this cause accidents where they injure or kill not only innocent people on the road (other motorists, pedestrians and bicyclists) but also themselves.

Stricter anti-drunk driving laws today do not just require apprehension of adult drivers (aged 21 years old or above) whose blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level is 0.08% or above, but also of teen drivers (those below 21 years old) if any alcohol is ever traced in their blood or breath.

As explained by West Palm Beach car accident lawyers, once a driver reaches the legal limit of consumption, critical motor functions become impaired and the driver is thus unable to safely operate his/her vehicle to the best of his or her abilities. Thus, besides arresting alcohol-impaired drivers themselves, business establishments and certain individuals can now be held answerable too for certain accidents that are alcohol-related. The legal responsibility of business establishments and certain individuals is rooted on the stipulations of the Dram Shop Act. According to the law firm Habush Habush & Rottier S.C.®, the Dram Shop Act is a law which can make a host or a business establishment (including a restaurant, a bar, or a tavern where alcoholic drinks are sold) accountable for any injuries or damages an intoxicated person causes, but only if such host or establishment still offers or sells alcoholic drinks to such person who is already intoxicated. Civil liability extends to anyone the intoxicated person injures or kills.

Currently, the states of Delaware, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Nebraska, Nevada, South Dakota, and
Virginia do not have dram shop liability.

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