Effects of Electrocution

Posted on Mar 29, 2017 | 0 comments


Effects of Electrocution

Electrocution, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is one of the “fatal four,” or one of the major causes of occupational accidents resulting to injuries and deaths in construction sites. In the whole of U.S., however, the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) says that it is the fifth leading cause of work-related injuries and deaths.

Workers who are most prone to electrocution accidents include electricians, electrical helpers, utility workers, construction workers and those working in manufacturing sites. The highest number of injuries and deaths, however, come from the those who work in construction sites and those whose work is directly involved in the maintenance and repair of overhead power lines. Power line workers often accidentally come in contact with overhead power lines, while in construction sites workers sometimes accidentally get electrocuted by high voltage wires or by arcing or jumping high levels of power from electrically charged cables (high voltage refers to voltage above 500).

According to San Diego personal injury attorneys of Ritter & Associates, the United States Bureau of Labor reports that roughly 150,000 construction site injuries and almost 1,000 fatalities occur every year in the U.S.; about 400 of these fatalities are due to electrocution. Workers, who suffer work-related injuries, though, may be able to receive financial support to help pay for medical bills and other damages.

As explained by the firm Abel Law, construction sites need electricity to power different types of tools and equipment. Though needed, this flow of energy can also be dangerous if not handled properly. The following types of faulty products can put a person at risk of electrocution:

• Faulty power strips
• Faulty power tools
• Faulty cords attached to power tools
• Faulty extension cords

The effects of electrocution are always serious because it makes the body a conduit instead of it fending off electricity. As the body becomes a conduit, it allows high voltage of electrical current to cause injuries both inside and outside it, such as severe internal and/or external burns, spinal cord injuries, brain damage, heart attack, muscle damage, paralysis and death. Muscle damage can result to swelling of the limb which, in turn, can lead to “compartment syndrome” (compression of the arteries) wherein blood is prevented from reaching the (affected) limb.

Other effects of severe electrical shocks include intense muscle contractions, fatal heart arrhythmia, brain and nerve injuries, serious injuries to internal organs and fall accidents.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *